Sitzbook Book Recommendation: ‘The Forever War’ by Joe Haldeman

Hi! Wow, it's been so long since I wrote here I'll soon be able to count my absence in years, not months. But oh well, no one's perfect. And neither is our internet or computer situation, which is also the main reason I've been gone so long. I'm planning on writing more stuff ASAP, but I just wanted to write a short blurb now about a book that I read earlier in this year for my Sitzbook book-a-week reading project. It's called The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. When I read the description, it sounded Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: ‘The Almost Nearly Perfect People’ by Michael Booth

I've finally gotten to the point where I'm going to review (or at least talk about and share some quotes from) some of the books that I read this year. This time I'm going to talk about The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia by Michael Booth. As far as non-fiction goes, this is one of the most interesting books I've read in a while. It talks about the Scandinavian countries and how they work (and don't work) in general. The subtitle of the book, "Behind Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: “The Art of Loving” by Erich Fromm

One of the best non-fiction books I read last year was The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm. It's sort of a philosophy book, which I'm normally not terribly interested in, but it was still enjoyable, especially because it was free. I had come across a few partial quotes from the book before, so I had a feeling that it would be interesting. Here is one that I had used in classes before for occasions like Valentine's Day: "Infantile love follows the principle: 'I love because I am loved.' Mature Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell

I'm still in Sitzbook housecleaning mode, so I'll keep doing a few more posts with some random quotes from books that I've liked recently. Here are two from Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success. "The historian David Arkush once compared Russian and Chinese peasant proverbs, and the differences are striking. 'If God does not bring it, the earth will not give it' is a typical Russian proverb. That's the kind of fatalism and pessimism typical of a repressive feudal system, where peasants Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: “William Shakespeare’s Star Wars” by Ian Doescher

I read a lot of books last year (52, to be exact, which is the whole point), but three of the best ones, or at least three of the ones I enjoyed the most, were the William Shakespeare's Star Wars series. Basically, Ian Doescher took the original Star Wars trilogy and re-wrote them as Shakespeare plays, iambic pentameter and all. It's a very impressive feat, and the best part is it combines the two perfectly. The books are highly entertaining for a Star Wars and literature nerd like me, and I Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: “Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?” by Mindy Kaling

Today we're back with another fast quote/review of a book, and this time it's from Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?" by Mindy Kaling. On the whole, I enjoyed the book, but it didn't necessarily light a fire under my butt. It was enjoyable and had some good stories, though. I particularly liked this quote in which she talks about the lessons that her parents taught her: "Lessons? When I was a kid, my parents smartly raised us to keep quiet, be respectful to older people, and generally not Read more [...]

Sitzbook Review: “A Piece of Danish Happiness” by Sharmi Albrechtsen

Here's another entry in my mini-reviews section from last year's Sitzbook project. This one is going to be a bit longer, though, since I've got more to say about it. Today's book is A Piece of Danish Happiness by Sharmi Albrechtsen. As a critic, one of my greatest weaknesses is surely that I'm not terribly critical. I often like most of what I read, watch, and listen to, or if I don't, I quickly move on and don't dwell on it. I also feel bad criticizing other people's work, especially writers, Read more [...]